Skip to main content

Deep Dive Ep. 16 | Who Has It Worse?

Men and women value attractiveness differently with contemporary research showing a asymmetric distribution of the halo effect and the benefits it provides to one’s desirability. The Halo effect has been popularized as a positive attribution given to strangers, where we expect better looking individuals to have more positive personality traits, regardless of it being true or not. 


Daniel Bar-Tal and Saxe’s paper notes an asymmetrical and unidimensional boost to personality characteristics by virtue of being attractive. Unidimensional meaning that all character stats get an equal boost from the halo effect, but asymmetric meaning that this is not applied equally to both sexes. More importantly, men benefit less from being physically attractive than women do and part of this is due to societal gender-roles placed upon each sex.

  • Daniel Bar-Tal; Leonard Saxe (1976). Physical attractiveness and its relationship to sex-role stereotyping. , 2(2), 123–133. 
QOVES Deep Dive
QOVES Deep Dive
Deep Dive Ep. 16 | Who Has It Worse?
/